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Posts tagged "Child Custody"

Maintaining consistent rules for children of divorced parents

Divorced parents with shared custody in Arizona face the challenge of setting consistent rules for their children. Considering the negative impact of contradictory rules coming from separate households, parents should be willing to work together to come to a consensus.

How to avoid conflict with a hostile parent

When Arizona parents of young children get a divorce, they are never truly separated. In most cases they will necessarily need to interact with each other for co-parenting purposes. When one parent is behaving badly towards the other, it presents a situation that tests the diplomacy skills of even the mildest mannered personality. During those times, parents must keep reminding themselves that the best interest of the child applies.

American fathers deeply connected to parenthood

Arizona fathers and their counterparts across the United States are perhaps more deeply connected to their identity as parents than ever before. A 2015 survey by the Pew Research Center indicates the strong connection to fatherhood and child-rearing expressed by American dads. As more and more children experience fathers as primary caregivers and stay-at-home dads, fathers across the country report that their own lives are deeply enriched by parenthood.

Nesting as an alternative to traditional joint custody

Arizona parents who would like to share custody of their children after a divorce but who are concerned about the potentially destabilizing effect on the children of moving between homes might want to consider nesting. This refers to an arrangement in which the parents and not the children rotate in and out of the family home.

Steps to take if a parent is abusing drugs or alcohol

Some Arizona parents who are going through a divorce might think their child could be in danger if the other parent abuses drugs or alcohol. They should mention these concerns at the custody hearing. Having documentation of the parent's substance abuse as well as any evidence that it has a negative impact on the child will help support their case.

Handling electronic communications between parent and child

Some Arizona parents who are divorced may have a visitation agreement that includes an arrangement for the noncustodial parent to communicate with the child using text, phone calls or video calls. In some cases, custodial parents might wonder whether they can prohibit the other parent from communicating with their child in this way. In general, courts discourage cutting off contact between a parent and child unless there is an issue such as domestic abuse.

Tips for a child custody hearing

Arizona parents who are divorcing might also be heading toward a custody battle. These are best avoided because the judge will have the final say, and the parent may not like the outcome. However, if they are unable to reach a compromise with the other parent, there are steps they can take to make it more likely they will receive custody.

Helping children through a divorce

Arizona parents whose marriage is coming to an end and who are concerned about how their children might react to a divorce may want to take some steps to help them adjust. Parents should make an effort to not argue in front of their children or say anything negative about the other parent. Instead, they should react positively when children speak about their interactions with the other parent. Children may need to ask questions and might benefit from counseling.

Dealing with child custody exchanges

Arizona parents who are contemplating a divorce should know that child custody arrangements can be one of the most contentious issues that parents will have to address as they determine how to provide their child with what he or she needs to be well-adjusted. An arrangement typically details custody and visitation specifics, includes when, where and in what manner a child will be exchanged from the physical custody of one parent to the other.

How one parent's move may lead to changes in visitation

When Arizona parents divorce, they might agree to live near one another to make it easier for their child to move between households. However, this could change if one parent has a new partner a long distance away. That parent might want to move to be nearer that partner. Even though the parent may make an effort to settle somewhere that is not too far from either their new partner or their child, the commute could be an added burden. The other parent might react angrily and refuse to drive the child to the home of the parent who has moved.

Contact

Law Office of Michael A. Johnson, P.C.
177 N Church Avenue
Suite 311
Tucson, AZ 85701

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