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Sharing the parenting responsibilities after divorce

When Arizona parents decide to divorce, the logistical and emotional efforts involved in co-parenting can weigh heavily. Even the most amicable of divorcing spouses can face struggles when it comes to co-parenting, as each parent has to deal with the reality of not being with his or her child full-time. By keeping several guidelines in mind, divorcing parents can help to make the journey towards successful co-parenting easier and less stressful for both themselves and their children.

How abusive parents may try to get custody of children

Some Arizona parents might be concerned during a divorce about the other parent having access to their children if that parent has been abusive. Courts generally encourage children to spend time with both parents, and in some cases, allegations of abuse might not be believed or adequately investigated.

Shared parenting is favored by most courts

Arizona parents considering divorce or already dealing with custody disputes have probably heard about shared parenting. In recent years, most jurisdictions in the U.S. have moved toward the notion that joint custody is the preferred parenting arrangement for children whose parents live separately. Studies have shown that children are more likely to prosper when both parents are active and involved in their lives.

Many types of child custody arrangements available

Arizona parents who are getting a divorce may need to make child custody decisions. This includes deciding whether they will ask for joint or sole legal and physical custody. Legal custody gives a parent the right to make decisions about certain aspects of a child's life such as religion, education and health care. Physical custody determines which parent the child lives with.

Maintaining consistent rules for children of divorced parents

Divorced parents with shared custody in Arizona face the challenge of setting consistent rules for their children. Considering the negative impact of contradictory rules coming from separate households, parents should be willing to work together to come to a consensus.

How to avoid conflict with a hostile parent

When Arizona parents of young children get a divorce, they are never truly separated. In most cases they will necessarily need to interact with each other for co-parenting purposes. When one parent is behaving badly towards the other, it presents a situation that tests the diplomacy skills of even the mildest mannered personality. During those times, parents must keep reminding themselves that the best interest of the child applies.

American fathers deeply connected to parenthood

Arizona fathers and their counterparts across the United States are perhaps more deeply connected to their identity as parents than ever before. A 2015 survey by the Pew Research Center indicates the strong connection to fatherhood and child-rearing expressed by American dads. As more and more children experience fathers as primary caregivers and stay-at-home dads, fathers across the country report that their own lives are deeply enriched by parenthood.

Nesting as an alternative to traditional joint custody

Arizona parents who would like to share custody of their children after a divorce but who are concerned about the potentially destabilizing effect on the children of moving between homes might want to consider nesting. This refers to an arrangement in which the parents and not the children rotate in and out of the family home.

Steps to take if a parent is abusing drugs or alcohol

Some Arizona parents who are going through a divorce might think their child could be in danger if the other parent abuses drugs or alcohol. They should mention these concerns at the custody hearing. Having documentation of the parent's substance abuse as well as any evidence that it has a negative impact on the child will help support their case.

Contact

Law Office of Michael A. Johnson, P.C.
177 N Church Avenue
Suite 311
Tucson, AZ 85701

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