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DNA paternity testing: alleged versus biological evidence

In Arizona and across the United States, divorced men may need to take DNA paternity tests to prove or disprove biological fatherhood. Parental questions are important issues affecting the upbringing of children. Establishing paternity is significant for a child conceived out of wedlock because an unmarried man is not automatically the legal father of his partner's child. Instead, he is called the baby's "alleged father" unless a DNA paternity test shows that he is the biological father. Additionally, the law does not require an alleged father's name to appear on the baby's birth certificate.

Study finds wide national variance in child support payments

According to the software company Custody X Change, a typical child support payment in Arizona is among the lowest in the country, with the usual payments ranging from about $400 to $528. However, just across the state line in New Mexico, the typical payment is $735 to $880, and in Nevada, it is $881 to $1,187. With every state calculating child support differently, a parent who is relocating might want to consult an attorney to find out how child support payments will be affected.

Child support, taxes and modifications

Child support obligations in Arizona are based on such factors as parental income, how many kids are involved and other costs, such as health care and education. However, separated parents should remember that it's possible to modify a child support arrangement when necessary.

DNA testing can be important in child support cases

Just as DNA testing is becoming increasingly indispensable in criminal cases to convict a suspect or exonerate a wrongly imprisoned person, these tests are also essential in Arizona family courts. DNA testing is far more accessible and affordable than in the past, and it is often used for genealogy projects. The high accuracy of DNA tests, exceeding 99.99 percent, means that they offer a firm basis for determining legal parenthood.

How child support benefits children

Parents in Arizona and throughout the country are generally responsible for providing financial support to their children. Child support payments may be used to cover a variety of expenses from food and shelter to the cost of attending college. Support payments may also be used to cover miscellaneous expenses such as keeping the lights on in an apartment or heating a home that the child lives in.

Obtaining child support

Before Arizona parents are able to obtain a child support order, the relationship between the parents and the child must be established first. Maternity is established when the woman gives birth to the child. Paternity can be acknowledged in multiple ways.

Understanding different types of child support

Child support payments can be confusing for both non-custodial and custodial parents. Parents in Arizona may be affected by federal laws governing child support. To understand how child support works, it is important for parents to understand the different types.

Understanding child support obligations with joint custody

Determining child support can be one of the most difficult and complicated aspects of getting divorced. Child support is typically determined by the Child Support Standards Act, but that statute doesn't address joint custody. In order to determine joint custody obligations, parents and their legal representatives must sift through quite a bit of information. Here is a closer look at some of the factors that are used to determine child support in Arizona and other states throughout the country.

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Law Office of Michael A. Johnson, P.C.
177 N Church Avenue
Suite 311
Tucson, AZ 85701

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